Saturday, December 17, 2016

Bloody Friday

True confession time.

I voted for Kim Ogg.

It wasn't an easy decision.  I had a few reservations about some of Kim's portrayals to the media on things she knew weren't exactly accurate when it came to the law.  Kim is a former Chief Prosecutor under Johnny Holmes and she knew better.  She did a lot of spinning on things that were contrary to law in order to get some votes.

I like Devon Anderson and I adored Mike.  Not voting for her bothered me tremendously.  It wasn't because I bought into the hype and spin of the Planned Parenthood or "Jailed Rape Victim" stories or that I thought she was a bad person.

But at the end of the day, things Devon said on the campaign trail led me to believe that there was too much of an "Us versus Them" mentality that she fostered at the D.A.'s Office.  This culminated in her saying something to the effect of "We all know there is nothing a defense attorney won't say to get a case reversed" during the one D.A. debate.  That implication that my side of the courtroom was a profession filled with nothing but wholesale liars didn't sit well with me, and ultimately, I realized that a vote for Devon was really starting to feel like a vote against myself -- and all of my clients.

I made my final decision to vote for Kim Ogg because I agreed with her overall outlook on the Criminal Justice System.  I know this is going to lead to backlash from some of my law enforcement friends, but I agree with not filing crack pipe cases as felonies.  I agreed with Lykos when she stopped filing them, and I agree with Kim for saying she won't file them.  I feel the same way about her marijuana policies.  When she said that our drug policies were labeling a large segment of our community as criminals who otherwise wouldn't be, I agreed with her.

I also had this underlying belief that Kim Ogg was no Pat Lykos.  I thought Kim had a better understanding of the men and women that work at the Harris County District Attorney's Office and that she lacked Lykos' mean and vindictive streak.  I thought that Kim would make good and practical decisions when it came to whom she kept and whom she didn't.

Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

Yesterday, Kim Ogg stunned pretty much everyone in the CJC building by firing not renewing the contracts of 38 Assistant District Attorneys under her Administration.  Yes, it is absolutely true that this happens with every Administration, but the numbers are usually relatively small.  I believe that my firing class was right around 10 people (and I was proudly at the head of that class).  Kim basically quadrupled that number.

And the way she went about it was pretty damn tasteless.  It was certainly a cowardly way to end the careers of 38 people who had devoted years (and in many cases, decades) to the D.A.'s Office.

Kim had let it be known on Thursday that her Administration would send out an e-mail at noon on Friday and each prosecutor would get one.  That e-mail would tell the prosecutor whether they would be welcome in the new Administration.  No personal interaction.  I mean, damn, even I got the honor of being personally fired by Jim Leitner and Roger Bridgwater.  I even shook old Roger's hand!

Not only was the Death by Email plan a disturbing indication that the Ogg Administration is going to be doing some things that they can't quite look you in the eye about, they weren't even punctual about it.  Prosecutors had to sit at their desks past noon, waiting.  Waiting to see if they needed to pack up their home away from home and start a completely knew career path in life -- in the next two weeks.

And then there was the media.

Cameras were posted at the D.A.'s Office and in front of the building.  Someone -- gee, I wonder who -- had managed to stage 38 people getting fired at Christmas time into a media event.

Nice.

So, let's talk about the firings themselves.

As I mentioned above, a certain amount of firings are to be expected, and they usually begin at the Bureau Chief Level.  For those unfamiliar with the hierarchy of the Office, there is the elected D.A., followed by the First Assistant, followed by the Bureau Chiefs.  They are the equivalent of a President's Cabinet, and like in a Presidency, it is to be expected that the District Attorney would want her own handpicked Cabinet.  This is not to say that any of the terminated Bureau Chiefs were bad prosecutors or deserved termination, but there is a certain risk involved when one rises so high in the Office.

If I'm not mistaken, all of the Bureau Chiefs were not invited to return.

The next step below Bureau Chiefs are the Division Chiefs.  Division Chiefs are most definitely senior prosecutors and comprise the most talented trial attorneys in the Office.  I believe that Kim elected not to renew all but three of the Division chiefs.

Unlike the Bureau Chiefs, the Division Chiefs aren't quite as easily described as being the normal part of any Administration Change.  Although they were certainly senior, the job description of a Division Chief is much more of a leader in the field.  For instance, all Death Penalty Capital cases require a Division Chief to be sitting on the case, along with a District Court chief.  They embody the battle-tested prosecutor who knows how to try complex and difficult cases.  Most of them all started their career under Johnny Holmes and continued through all of the successive administrations, including Lykos.

I'm not exactly sure who told Kim that firing her most talented and experienced prosecutors was in the best interest of the Office.

After the firings of the Division Chiefs, it becomes a bit scattershot.  There are several District Court Chiefs (more experience) and a couple of Felony Twos.  I may be mistaken, but I don't think I saw anyone below the Felony Two level on Kim's list.

Some of the people on the below Division Chief level were not surprising terminations.  Rightfully or wrongfully, they were on the media radar, and thus the New Administration's radar.   Most of these firings were disappointingly based more on hype than substance.  My biggest concern about Kim becoming the District Attorney was that she would govern her Office with more attention to perception than reality.  That was clearly the case on many of the fires.

The most troubling of the firings, however, fall under the category of "Who the hell did they piss off?"  These were the fires that left almost everyone in the Criminal Justice community scratching their heads and wondering why these seemingly good, ethical, and well-liked prosecutors weren't continuing in their jobs.  I'm not going to name any of the prosecutors who were terminated because I don't want this popping up when future employers or clients do an internet search of their names.

In the immediate aftermath of the D.A. election, I had written this post and told prosecutors not to worry about the jackasses who walked around bragging of their "wish lists" of firings.  Apparently, those wish lists were a little more prevalent than I would have imagined.

After having a day to talk about these particular terminations, there seemed to be a developing pattern of these prosecutors having beefs with the dynamic duo of Roger Bridgwater and Jim Leitner -- with a little bit of Dick DeGuerin's influence tossed in for good measure.  There are some early indications of another former prosecutor who wielded some influence, too, but I haven't confirmed that yet.  However, let's just say that if he is returning under the Ogg Administration, her call for less aggressive "win-at-all-costs" prosecuting will be regarded as a complete and total joke.

It won't be surprising if Leitner and Bridgwater return to the D.A.'s Office, or, at a minimum, have Kim Ogg's ear.  Those two die hard Republicans have made no secret about being on Team Ogg ever since Lykos got decimated in the 2012 primary by Mike Anderson.  I hope that Kim Ogg remembers that as much as I disliked Bridgwater and Leitner on a personal level, I looked like a member of their fan club compared to the rank and file that worked under them.  They were widely regarded as petty tyrants and bullies by the Assistant D.A.'s.

If Leitner and Bridgwater are, in fact, returning to the D.A.'s Office, I don't know what to say other than Welcome back!  This blog and I have missed you.

All in all, the Ogg Administration got off to a bad start yesterday.  If her first goal was to decimate morale, she certainly accomplished that.  She seemed to take no notice of the idea that when you become the elected official over any government agency, you want people to be rooting for you -- and that begins with the people who work for you.  Although some of her terminations were justified, there were many that were not.  Her message seems to be taken out of the Pat Lykos Playbook, except it is making Lykos look tame by comparison.

I still have hope that Kim can become a good D.A. if she actually starts governing with less attention to perception and more to reality.  Kim should remember that Lykos, Leitner and Bridgwater basically governed a running four year mutiny before getting blasted out of Office.  It was a miserable situation for everyone involved.  Miserable situations don't attract good personnel and without good personnel, you cannot have a good Office.

That's a lesson that the Ogg Administration is going to have to learn the hard way, apparently.

130 comments:

Anonymous said...

Kim met with three people at the District Attorney's Office before Bloody Friday. THREE. I have a feeling it's going to be a rough four years for the HCDAO.

wayne dolcefino said...

Murray,

Not sure facts matter, but since I handled communications for Kim during the campaign I thought I should help educate you.

The notion that Kim, me or anyone else associated with the campaign asked that cameras be there to capture the normal transition at the District Attorney;s Office is absurd. I don't play that way. Either does Kim.

You said it yourself, the culture of the DA's office had changed. To change the culture you have to make serious changes. Kim spent weeks with her team and talked to lot's of prosecutors before making her decisions.

She wouldn't name names. Offered people a chance to resign.

You also know that the media has been full of headlines in recent years about cases of alleged prosecutorial misconduct, even possible criminal wrongdoing stemming from the District Attorney's Office. The place has been a black hole for public corruption complaints and consumer fraud.

Some of the changes announced Friday will re direct precious resources for an attack on serious crime.

My consulting firm was glad to help Kim. She is a long time friend, and as a reporter I worked with her at the gang task force and crime stoppers.

Give her a chance. She began her transition after Thanksgiving. Prosecutors wanted to know yesterday. Waiting until January would have been a greater disruption to the office.

Voters want change. Sometimes that means a change of leadership.

Cheap shot.

Wayne Dolcefino
President
Dolcefino Consulting







Anonymous said...

After 20 years with the feds, I like to take the time to tell baby prosecutors how important it is to work hard, try to do the right thing and above all, avoid the politics.

Many listen and a few do not. Those who choose one side or another run the risk of being in one day and out the next.

I have not seen the list, but it is clear there are a handful who need to go *struggles not to name names* and many that are going to be really good prosecutors if given a chance.

I will wait to see how this shakes out with who is out before I make a judgement on whether it was a good call or not.

Murray Newman said...

Hang on while I process being lectured by Wayne Dolcefino on cheap shots . . .

Did you even read what I wrote?

Perhaps you should actually read the article and embrace the positive things I've said about the incoming administration rather than getting your feathers ruffled over receiving ANY criticism. I didn't criticize the timing of the firings. I think we all know that can't be avoided. I also agreed that changes in upper administration are part of an incoming administration and that is fair game.

So spare me your lecture and canned responses that play well to a less discerning readership. That didn't impress anyone when it came from the Anderson Administration and it won't impress anyone when it comes from Ogg.

Nathan Hennigan said...

Hey Wayne, get bent. Kim talked to no one. I got fired yesterday and all I have ever done is put a bunch of murderers in prison. The last time I talked to Kim Ogg, she lied to me about a murderer she was representing. He was about to be tried and she came in begging for a reset because her Dad was in the hospital. Of course I agreed. Where did she go after that
...the hospital? Nope! Straight over to a press conference she staged to complain about the Porch Pooch.

Anonymous said...

"Not sure facts matter, but since I handled communications for Kim during the campaign "

Your lack of certainty about that sure explains a hell of lot...

Murray Newman said...

I also love that Dolcefino wants us to believe that they orchestrated a mass termination at high noon on a specified day, but that it was a complete coincidence that the media was there at that exact time.

Anonymous said...

Hey Murray, did I miss the memo that the second coming of Hooper just showed up and changed his name to Dolcefino?

Anonymous said...

I personally worked with many of the people she fired for years. Any insinuation that she was "cleaning house" or getting rid of corrupt prosecutors is insulting. Kim got rid of many of the hardest working, most knowledgeable public servants in the office. These were people respected by Judges, the defense bar, and beyond. She sure sent a message that she was "cleaning house" but she took the roof off, all the walls out, and the windows and doors off. Without those people, her house is going to get a lot of dirt blowing in. I'm not sure how she can claim it's clean when it has nothing to protect it left. The prosecutor's job is tough. They have an enormous work load. She just gutted the office of the top brass, removing 38 prosecutors, which leaves whose left without bosses, supervisors, and leaders. She fired at least two husband-wives who have children at home ... 9 days before Christmas! How heartless can she be!? How stupid? I am sick to my stomach when I think of all of the talent, all of the wonderful, hard working people, that she let go, for what? Pettiness? Politics? Because she needs to "send a message?" The message she sent is similar to the one Lykos sent: be afraid.

Anonymous said...

.....being on the Anderson campaign trail didn't help anyone on that list.

Anonymous said...

I feel bad for the prosecutors that are left...what are they garbage? Unfit to try a case. Because it seems Devon thinks who is left cannot seek justice. Ogg did not fire EVERYONE.

Anonymous said...

Wayne,

You're a narcissistic hack. Your presence anywhere near a cause or candidate is highly suspicious. In your world, facts are inconvenient unless they support your agenda. Kim could have run her campaign with integrity, relying on her experience and vision for the office. Instead she turned to you, and similar to King Midas, everything you touched turned to crap.

I'm still here. I voted for Kim and I'll work hard to honor the oath I swore, but I'll never forget the good men and women she sacrificed in the name of political expediency.

My one piece of advice for her as it relates to her association with you: when you lie down with a dog, you're going to wake up covered in fleas.

Nathan Hennigan said...

You are right. There are a lot of great people who didn't get fired. Hopefully Kim Ogg will treat them with respect and get out of their way because Harris County needs them to prosecute important cases.

Anonymous said...

Wayne,

Really?

Hahahahahahahahahahahaha.

Excuse me. I just laughed so hard snot came out of my nose.

Hahahahahahahahahahaha,

Anonymous said...

OK for those survivors you are living in a new reality.

If Leitner and Bridgwater are returning the rules have reverted back to the Lykosian era.

Loyalty to the office is now second to loyalty to the Leader.

Do not read or post on this blog from an office computer, even at 3:00 am from intake. They can and will monitor all DAO computer contact with this blog. Especially once things heat up as they will.

If you do post on this blog be careful so that Team Ogg cannot figure out who did the posting.

Good luck.

Nathan Hennigan said...

Also Wayne, there was only one camera crew and one reporter camped out in the lobby to get fired prosecutor walk of shame footage. It was ABC13's Deborah Wrigley. A reporter you happen to have worked with at ABC13 for about 30 years. What a coincidence that she knew to be there at noon!

Anonymous said...

News From The Bunker:

Item:

We have been silent for a time. We are still here. We have always been here. We will always be here. We were not all fired.




End of line.

Anonymous said...

Re: Anonymous 3:46

Sure, she didn't fire *everyone*, but that's not the point. She gutted the felony division chiefs and several felony chiefs that the less experienced prosecutors rely on. You do know that you don't start out trying agg sex assaults and cap murders, right? Many of the felony 2s haven't tried a murder or sex assault yet. Guys like Hennigan busted their ass, took tough cases, ran a good court and for that didn't even get a face to face.

Dolcefino- I like how you repeat the talking point line that it was the DAs who wanted to know and still deflect from how poorly it was all handled. Apparently accountability and transparency will not be a part of the new regime.

I hope their are no delusions by the defense bar that this will encourage ADAs to exercise discretion......

Anonymous said...

Felony 2s who have not tried a murder yet....thats probally a problem started under Anderson. She shares the blame as well.

Anonymous said...

She had to make room for all the ACLU. LULAC, and LGBTQ lawyers that she promised jobs to. This is part of the George Soros take-over of the local elections. Sleep tight Harris County, you just got bought and paid for by a Nazi collaborator.

Murray Newman said...

The more I think about this, I can't help but wonder if Ogg wanted Dolcefino to draft a response to this, or if he just went Rogue Moron.

Anonymous said...

I don't work in Harris Co. I never met Devon, I never met Kim. But have received enormous help from two of the prosecutors on the list, and learned much from others who taught at CLEs around the state. My assessment is that the HCDA just shot her own office in the head. Sad. Stupid. Prayers to all of you.

Anonymous C said...

So wayne your going to devote more resources to tacking serious crime uhhh who's gonna prosecute this serious crime when ya fired some of the best ones ya had...uhh dispatch show me on a park check for the rest of the shift there's no point in arresting anyone any more

Anonymous said...

HPD rank and file, especially in the investigative divisions, are livid. This is catastrophic for the citizens of Harris County.

Anonymous said...

My guess is that Cocaine Wayne went rogue. But who a person associates with shows a person's true character.

Lance said...

I was one of the ones fired. Thank you Murray for shielding my name, but the Comical published it so it is what it is. Good people were let go. People who had NEVER done anything wrong. In fact, most of the major courtroom victories during the last 10 years were won by one of us. But Little Jimmy is back in the house and has axes to grind. I used to like him. I tried to like him. I forgave him for many stupid decisions. But I cannot forgive him for this one. I will be fine. In fact, I am honored to be on the list of people fired. While there are still so many great people left, I think the world of the people on "the list." They talked to none of us. They had no idea what we do. I suspect forfeiture funds are gone. Actually, I hope "my" cops start bringing all of the money to the feds. Death Penalty cases, well all I need to say is Soros. I loved Devon. I was not political. But she treated us with respect. After 4 years of Lykos (and really Chuck towards the end) it was needed. But I, and the rest of us, will move on. But Kim Ogg watch out. Since you never talked to us you don't know what we know. But I suspect you will soon enough.

Anonymous said...

Murray,

Your comment at 5:31--There were too many typos in that post to not be rogue, right? Looks like Wayne is the second coming of Hooper. He should be embarrassed.

Anonymous said...

Wayne has zero credibility. He would never let a fact or truthfulness get in the way of his gotcha - style of reporting. His presence with Kim is one of the bigger signs of concern for our future in Harris county. And the elimination of the lower level chiefs is so chilling.... there are some great prosecutors left behind but they will mind and be loyal soldiers or they're next. Sickening.

Anonymous said...

The people Kim fired were dedicated, ethical and excellent lawyers. Anyone who has had the misfortune of appearing in court against Kim in recent years knows she is none of those things. Good luck to those who remain and all the best to those who are gone. The office will not be the same.

MDW said...

Just a quick note Bud-to say,you presented a very thought filled letter ref/ voting for Ogg. Have a feeling there are a few thousand Harris County voters that would shake their heads up and down in silent agreement right about now.

Anonymous said...

I'm one of the "lucky" ones who didn't get fired. Instead, I get to work for a boss who fires people without meeting with them or believing that she should give a reason. She'll end careers and crash lives because she got lucky enough to ride a partisan wave into office.

For four years I had a boss who had my back. Now I'm about to have a boss who will call a press conference to denounce me the moment she thinks she can get a good news cycle out of doing so. And then she'll tip off journalists as to where I parked so they can film me putting my belongings in my car.

It's hard to guess why she did this. Perhaps she thought by getting rid of the best and most experienced of us she wouldn't leave any influential enemies. But prior to Friday I was looking forward to working in a new administration, hoping that they might shake things up in a positive way. Now I regard her and everyone she brings in with her as an enemy. In the last day and a half I don't think I've talked to anyone in the office who feels otherwise. She did bad things to good people who didn't deserve it: That's the opposite of what prosecutors should do.

Jigs said...

Just curious. I keep hearing "change the culture" and now "evidence based" prosecutions. What exactly does that mean? I certainly understand and agree that minor offenses need more bond availability, and that marijuana offenses can be handled consistently with changes in public opinion, etc. And, it looked from afar that drug offenses generally are being directed towards treatment. But didn't we always prosecute based on evidence? Or does it mean that cases have to be trial ready before filing? I'm stumped.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone think she will have the guts to show at the swearing in ceremony? May she be met with stony silence, or better yet, a chorus of boos. Love to see that on the news.

Anonymous said...

I had posted early that i would reserve judgment until I saw the list.

As defense counsel, I can say that list contains many who we will miss, Nathan you are one, and more than a few that needed to move on from that office.

All of them were based on politics and not capability.

Anonymous said...

Some observations:

1) If you need any further evidence that this web site is influential with the new Ogg administration look no further than the fact that Wayne found it necessary to comment. Well done, Wayne! (And I am sure that our current Mayor has some thoughts about your views on cheap shots). And in that spirit I hope you pass on my comments to Kim.

2) Elections have consequences. Kim was well within her rights to do what she did -- as much as many of us in the office are saddened by it. She meant what she said about a new culture -- the majority of the people let go were individuals with more than 20 years experience. They will be replaced by outsiders she hired or internal candidates elevated to positions of leadership by her. They will be HER people and will face the judgment of the voters in the future regarding her decision.

3) The long arm of Jim Leitner and his petty grievances (more on this later) is very present in Friday's action.

4) Kim has gotten off on the wrong foot and the fact that she has not transitioned from her campaign rhetoric is insulting to the prosecutors who remain. Terminating people with more than 20 years of experience via e-mail is insulting. It demonstrates that you have no courage and are a coward. You continue to talk about "evidence based prosecutions." What does that mean? On any given day there are more than 20,000 open cases -- do you think we are prosecuting these cases with fairy dust and positive thoughts? It is demeaning.

5) That there was a quid pro quo for the Soros money for a change in position on the death penalty is evident. Kim won't do it right away -- but my guess is it will happen soon. Probably after the SCOTUS rules on Buck and Moore.

6) The whole thing with a transition team working in the library reviewing files was a farce. It was done to protect against employment lawsuits. Kim lied. There absolutely was a preexisting list of employees who were going to be terminated. This includes several prosecutors who were ethical, successful, but the defense bar did not like because of their temperament, and Kim gave them what they wanted.

7) The rumors about Leitner coming back are rampant. He is loathed and lacks the respect of any prosecutors from the Lykos era. He is viewed as a lightweight. His weightlifting video, badge on his belt, stories about the Coast Guard and requirement that his desk be regularly cleaned with Windex remain the butt of jokes. Caveat emptor.

8) Kim -- you have demonstrated no knowledge or experience regarding how to manage a 70 million dollar government entity. Take great care that you understand the implication of Lance's post above.

9) Kim -- there are more democrats in the office than you realize. Not everyone, including people you let go, were enamored with Devon; the bar poll should have told you that. Lots of prosecutors agree with you on marihuana and bail reform. Nevertheless, you can spin this however you want in a press conference, but this is the equivalent of Lykos throwing two senior, experienced prosecutors (both of whom have gone on to successful careers with the feds) under the bus within the first weeks of her administration in order to demonstrate that there was a new culture in town. She never recovered. You blew this and are immediately viewed by most of the staff as a person who cannot be trusted, is suspicious of staff, lacks decency, and does not have our backs. You need to figure out how to fix this situation quickly, or you will see this blog once again become what it was during the Lykos era -- a continuous source of leaks, news, and observation that regularly embarrassed her administration and contributed greatly to her demise.

Anonymous said...

Met with boos....idiots if they do. I dont care where you work if you openly boo your boss your ass should be fired. For those who are left do not fall victim by listening to those who got fired. Ogg wants you on her team so you should be proud. Go fight for Harris County.

Anonymous said...

Murray,
Many felt like you about this election. I even considered voting for Kim Ogg. At the end, I didn't because I hoped to spare the office from more upheaval. But, I felt Kim had good sense and could do the job but- boy was I wrong!

She isn't Kim Ogg. She is Kim Jong Ogg who has put all her Generals and ranking officers in front of an anti-aircraft gun. She has proven how unfit she is to do her job.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 11:26: She has a funny way of showing that she wants people on her team. She's identified her team as one that operates based on cowardly opportunism. That's not the team I signed up for.

Anonymous said...

As one who spoke with a lot of other ADA's in the office after the election, across the board there was a cautious optimism that Kim's rhetoric on the campaign trail was just that: rhetoric. And I am not talking about her vague policy ideals but rather her comments about the rank and file. It was hoped that once she became DA she would put behind the trite comments that might play well to a general public but had little basis in reality and get to work on some real reforms (that are much needed). Well, we were flat out WRONG. She could not have started her tenure any worse. There were a lot of talented, ethical and hard working attorneys whom were let go in the name of politics. If she would have taken the time to talk to any of them, she would have seen that they were not all pro-Devon. She would have seen that they were dedicated to this job and this office no matter who is at the front. If she takes the time, she'll see there are a lot of prosecutors left behind who still feel that way. She might might have a chance to still win us over, but it is going to take more than lip service. With all that being said, if Leitner has ANY role in this new administration, I'd say it is not something she will be able to recover from.

Anonymous said...

For all on the blog cowardly posting without names...if Ogg is that bad then add your name to the list and leave the office. If you are that upset, then find another job. No one is forcing you to stay. Thats what you do in America when you hate your new boss. Move on. Either be happy you were not fired or be angry and pissed and pack your box like the others.

Murray Newman said...

I can't see where you signed your name on your comment.

Anonymous posters are welcome on this blog because there are petty little politicians like Leitner and Bridgwater who will absolutely lobby for the termination of dissenters. I publish views I agree with and views I disagree with, regardless of whether or not the poster signs his or her name.

Anonymous said...

Nice observation, Anonymous.

Attorney said...

"For all on the blog cowardly posting without names...if Ogg is that bad then add your name to the list and leave the office."

Okay, from now on I'll use the the name that Kim addressed me by in the email. Presumably that means she'll know who I am and can add me to the list.

Anonymous said...

What baffles me is that of all the great prosecutors that were fired, how in the world did she keep EVERYONE at the level of felony 2 and below. You're telling me that there isn't a single unqualified felony 2, felony 3, or misdemeanor prosecutor? At least previous firings targeted a segment of every level -- it didn't just arbitrarily fire anyone who has double digit experience.

You'd rather have those kids prosecuting your murders with zero trial experience, than someone who was mean to little Jimmy Leitner? You don't think it'll get bad news coverage when they start losing all the trials?

Anonymous said...

What concerns me is that she is taking advice from defense attorneys and based on that advice, clearly firing those prosecutors who defense attorneys don't like because these prosecutors do their jobs and are tough. Does this mean that every time a defense attorney gets his or her feelings hurt in court or doesn't get what he or she wants Ogg will be called and we will be fired?

Her actions thus far are setting up a dangerous precedent. She is going to be so busy listening to defense attorneys complain about prosecutors that she won't be able to get anything else done. Prosecutors should, of course, be professional, but at the end of the day, we have a job to do and that usually means that defense attorneys and defendants aren't going to get what they want.

BRICK DRAGLINE said...

HAHAHAHAHA

Seriously???


Wayne Dolcefino posted a comment in defense of Ogg ???

That certainly doesn't carry any weight in Houston except to be more suspicious of Ogg.

Anonymous said...



Anon 12:56 look up Guy Fawkes mask on google.

I am anonymous

I am in the bunker.

Anonymous said...

Clearly, anon 12:56 is Leitwater!

Anonymous said...

What about the Investigators? Any word on us?

Anonymous said...

Any word what position Rachel Palmer will be assuming when the new year comes?

Luci Davidson said...

This is what happens when R and Ds follow the name. Murray and I know better than most of the ones let go. Fortunately, most that she let go can retire. Neither Murray or I could. She was going to bring her people in regardless of how good the reputations of the ADAs. That's politics. These people will be fine. They are good lawers. Its time to move on. The office will either make it or not, but the people she let go will be fine. Luci Davidson.

Anonymous said...

It really is a shame because Harris County has no idea what they've done with sheriff, DA, judges etc. They are going to find out the hard way and all of Harris County will suffer from all of this. I am afraid for where we are headed..

Anonymous said...

Nathan, I voted for Ogg. Not sure what her issue with you was, but you dealt fairly and reasonably with me when you were a misdemeanor chief on that case where the guy got three DWIS before we could dispose of the first one. I hope you land on your feet and suspect that you will do well whatever you opt to do next.I think Brady and defense of those who pushed the limits of Brady and MMA requirements played a large role in decidING who was in and who was out. Many Chiefs last year were spreading the word that MMA requests imposed no duty until a judge ordeed production. While it is true that the statute provides no sanctions for withholding it is false to teach that it imposes no duty upon a request. I have never heard of you withholding Brady or MMA and hope that you have not been one who has withheld these disclosures or provided them much later than the required practicable time frame. Therefore I wish you the best unless I learn otherwise. I also hope that Ogg is truly sending the message that transparency and punctuality is necessary for fairness in disclosures whether a case is being pledged or tried. Good luck to you and welcome to you if you come to the defense bar.

Anonymous said...

Also in the press conference about all of this she says she will not personally be prosecuting cop killer cases and others herself as in Deputy Goforth's case coming up. She must be kidding. I think with that she is about to piss a lot more people off than she already has

Anonymous said...

It rubbed me the wrong way when she said that in her press conference, but let's be honest--do we really want her handling real cases?

Lee said...

Prosecutors that were terminated: I laugh at you swine & you deserve all the grief that is coming to you. For so long you have gotten fat of the taxpayer dime & now you will be sent back to the bottom if the food chain where you belong. Prosecutors are generally subhuman swine that need to be humiliated often for all the public to see so as Yoda said "at an end your rule is, & not short enough it was". You are easily replacable & Ogg did not lose any skills or expierence that I would lament being rid of. Thise whining about the timing of the firings during the holidays should consider it as a taste of their own medicine.

To Kim Ogg (Wonder Woman): Great forst step! Your job is not to be liked by the first administration but to win hearts & minds by seeing justice done. It is better to instead of clean the house, just demolish the house & start from scratch to build a better house. I see the check that you wrote to the voters beginning to be cashed. Consider how many innocent people those disposable lawyers might have put in prison via prosecutorial misconduct.

Murray Newman said...

"Swine?"

Did you go to The Third Reich's Book of Cut Downs for that one?

Lots of spelling and grammatical errors here, Lee. Seems awfully familiar . . .

Anonymous said...

Lee=Hooper. He's baaaaaaaack!

Lee said...

Murray,

I stand by the attacks on prosecutors but do apologize for the spelling & grammar as I was typing this on my new touch phone while riding the bus on the pothole ridden streets of Westheimer (which is why it did not come across correctly).

Anonymous said...

Couldn't be Don. His husband won't let him have access to the electronics until he gets current with his child support payments.

Eva said...

I hear a lot of “the people who were fired never did anything wrong.” A couple on that list claim to be victims. Still others are mouthing off, trying to bait Ogg into firing them as martyrs. There are several things to consider, however, before drawing conclusions. Yes, there are a few prosecutors on that list who really shouldn’t be there (and, IMO, mistakes on Ogg’s part). But most of the people on that list were no surprise to anyone paying attention, and are understandable fires.

Ogg’s entire campaign was about change. Someone on that list chiseled out a tiny cave in an extremely specialized area of law, and was still worried about their job. If they were worried, not one other person on that list should have thought they were irreplaceable. No one in this business gets to say, “It’s a shame these decisions are so political,” because it’s not a “shame” when the politics work in their favor. And not all of the firings were political. Some appear to be “guilty by association,” and some are likely on that list because of their longevity. BUT. There are still several at the DAO who were conspicuously absent from the office (campaigning for Anderson) that weren’t fired.

Long is a great trial lawyer; he’s amazing in front of the jury, but being a prosecutor is more than just being an outstanding trial attorney, getting convictions, or sticking around long enough. It’s about being a good teammate, colleague, and leader. For years, Long went out of his way to ruin prosecutors’ careers if he deemed them “not worthy” of being at the DAO for whatever reason. He took pleasure in gossiping about people’s personal and professional downfalls just to be in the know. He ran off good people, and looked them up in the state bar to gloat about their next ventures. He might have been a good attorney, but he was a horrible colleague. He was the Terrell Owens of the office: Great individual player, horrible teammate.

Hennigan has a rep of liking what he considers to be “educated minorities,” and hating poor ones. He made a comment in a diversity training session to the effect that “We all know what kinds of people commit certain types of crime.” It’s not as though he was shy about his views. Early in his career at the DAO, Hennigan stole trial cases from a co-worker and lied about it when confronted (someone else who’s all about the individual to the detriment of the team). And then there was the whole Brian Wice/Michael Brown fiasco. The least of his errors in that incident was saying Wice looked like a rat.

Look at the list. You’ll see lots of folks who spent years cultivating a reputation of extreme prosecutorial zeal – to the point that it became an abuse of power. Some were on thin ice already. Some were on social media telling people to vote for Anderson, and NOT to vote for Ogg. Some were in the actual media as a consequence of the choices they made as prosecutors (right or wrong, the public perception was damaging). Some went out of their way to perpetuate a culture of cutthroat adversarialism against both colleagues and the defense bar. Some went out of their way to target other prosecutors for arbitrary reasons, track their progress through the office, sabotage their careers, blackball them from promotion, and harangue them until they left the office (there’s no redemption once certain people decide to stall your progress there). Some retaliated against other prosecutors for various reasons, none of which had anything to do with justice. Some have been rightfully grieved by the defense bar for their actions as prosecutors. Some misused city and/or county resources for personal reasons. No matter the reason, ultimately, almost everyone on that list bought and paid for their spot on it. Now they want refunds, but Ogg’s got receipts.

Anonymous said...

Some (if not all) of them were owed the professional courtesy of an explanation. None of them received it.

Is it listed somewhere in Ogg's receipts?

Anonymous said...

Damn! Who knew Eva's shit doesn't stink?

Anonymous said...

I voted for Ogg simply because Anderson had become a symbol for everything that a corrupt district attorney can be. She was even worse than Lykos! The final straw for me was when she negotiated a plum for the worst pedophile I have ever come across. He was her pal so he basically wasn't prosecuted: http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/No-prison-time-in-sexual-assault-case-6333949.php.

Anonymous said...

Hmmm....actually her shit smells like fresh linen... she just aired that dirty laundry.

Jason Truitt said...

How long was this bus?

Eva said...

Anonymous 5:23 pm: The manner of and basis for the firings are not the same, but I think you know that. False analogies don't make your point stronger, nor does moving the goalpost. Assuming, arguendo, that Ogg didn't meet with anyone or explain her reasoning before firing them (I wasn't there, so I have no idea what Ogg did or didn't do, nor with whom she may or may not have spoken), then yes, that was shitty. I'm sure you also know that in Texas, employment is voluntary on both sides of the equation, and Ogg doesn't owe anyone an explanation (though an in-person notice would have been, as you note, professional courtesy and a best practice). None of that detracts from anything I've previously stated.

Anon 6:17: A hit dog will holler...and, apparently, launch ad hominem attacks and non sequiturs. Have you anything substantive to add?

Anonymous said...

I tried to warn as many people as I could.

Anonymous said...

You're a good man Lance, and you'll be missed.

Anonymous said...

She did it because that's who she is and who she has always been. That's how she rolls. Get ready for more.

Anonymous said...

I'm a defense attorney and I'm not worried about a job. I post anonymously because I need to protect my clients from the vindictive, underhanded person who just obtained a lot of power over them.

Anonymous said...

Hey "EVA", if you know about ADAs stealing from the city/county, don't you have an ethical duty to report it?

Murray Newman said...

Please tell me you're kidding with this.

Anonymous said...

Devon should worry less about Soros money and come up with a better excuse for giving Buzzbee a dismissed DWI.

Anonymous said...

Things to take away from Ogg's press conference this morning--

1. She is montoring Facebook; and
2. She is monitoring this blog

Be cautious, folks.

Eva said...

Anon 8:17: Oh you sweet summer child. Don't change the subject. I never said anyone was stealing. Perhaps you were clumsily referring to my comment about an employee misusing city and county resources for personal reasons?

In that case, the person of which I speak was in favor with the Lykos administration (the administration at the time this event occurred). What makes you think the upper echelon *didn't* know? That was the same administration that happily overlooked Rachel Palmer allowing her husband to use Palmer's badge to misrepresent himself to a police officer. As one of the last to know, I wouldn't have had a friendly ear in that administration. But it's adorable how you're outraged at what you perceive to be *my* moral failing in that specific situation.

Go find someone who likes you and ask them for a hug.

Anonymous said...

Kim won't stop: http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Ogg-to-investigate-fired-prosecutors-10808392.php.

Anonymous said...

I know I am a little late to the game on this one, but it's been a tumultuous few days.

Lee, whether not I agree with your puerile comments, I cannot fathom that you quoted Yoda from Episode III. I do not think the english language has a word that can describe the mixture of heresy and idiocy of such an action.

The only conclusion I can draw is that you are a millenial and don't know any better (because if you are not...may the Force have mercy on your wretched soul).

I am not claiming to be one to teach people how to be good or decent but I can offer you this piece of advice: NEVER quote Yoda outside of the original three. It makes you look like a buffoon to do so.

Anonymous said...

I guess that would make more sense than Mary Ellen Conway.

Anonymous said...

I know many in law enforcement are not thrilled with the new DA. Trace cases will be gone and looks like marijuana cases will be dealt with by issuing citations. Marijuana is a gateway drug to other hard drugs and bigger crimes committed to support the drug habit. It looks like it will be a rough 4 years for law enforcement.

Anonymous said...

Not all law enforcement think a citation for o to 2oz pom case is all that bad, some are even glad they don't take those week trace case's anymore so someone can puff there dims numbers just to say they have a ton of them. As a rookie everyone goes to jail after about 20 years common sense kicks in, not everyone that screws up has to go to jail to learn a lesson. In no bleeding heart but I hope they use the pre trial diversion program more for some one that gets popped so someone can pad there dims numbers.

Anonymous said...

"Marijuana is a gateway drug" to the racket of drug asset forfeiture laws. I encourage the dismissed attorneys to review the 14th Amendment and give up trying to support yourselves by ruining civilian lives over some Colorado agribusiness. You get no tears from me.

Anonymous said...

They don't want the "win at all costs" prosecutors but they are bringing Warren Diepraam back?? How the hell does that make any sense.

Anonymous said...

Kim Ogg stunned pretty much everyone in the CJC building by firing not renewing the contracts of 38 Assistant District Attorneys under her Administration.
~~~
I came here after seeing the article in the Chron about the not fired firings. Forgive me for asking but I did not see the answer to this in either your blog or the article but how many prosecutors does that leave her with and how big of a task will it be to replace them? Where do you pull talent like that from? Is it a Herculean task or something that won't be a big deal if she's been planning it for months?

Anonymous said...

The office is left with over 250 prosecutors....not including the new talent she will bring to the office.

Anonymous said...

Anon 8:18, like most things in life there is a learning curve here, especially in Harris County which does a great many things differently than other counties across the state. Anyone that denies that has no experience in the field (and probably calls themselves an "energy executive" or some other lie). The people let go were in most cases the most seasoned staff, all of the remaining ADA's relying on one or more of those dismissed on a regular basis to help with legal points. In fact, many of those dismissed teach classes across the state so their professional expertise is well documented.

If the "new talent" is comprised of newly minted lawyers, the learning curve will be steep indeed under these circumstances but even seasoned defense attorneys typically make rookie mistakes when brought in, Kim herself already showing the exact mentality she claimed existed under the current administration. Whether or not she lied, because there is a chance she just shot from the hip without knowing squat about what she was talking about, her failure to acknowledge the loss of expertise shows she is in denial. The hope by butt kissing fools like "Grits" is that her public stance in favor of bail reform and against the death penalty warrants overlooking these failings and the many likely to come out as she stumbles around. Working at Daddy's boutique law firm and serving in figurehead positions for public organizations doesn't prepare you for a position like this.

Over time, the new members will learn the ropes the old fashioned way, by making mistakes. and her well meaning political cronies brought in for the upper level positions will get a lot of egg on their faces, likely to start pointing fingers when they fall short. Kim has already set the tone of the new administration by making false accusations based on innuendo over evidence, many of her dismissals also following that pattern, and a willingness to dismiss over how a case looks versus the facts. As a result, expect many more to find sweeter opportunities in surrounding communities that will move heaven and earth to hire these people as quickly as possible. But who isn't concerned when an irate public official starts announcing how they are going to launch investigations in knee jerk fashion, when they can't even articulate a crime?

Anonymous said...

Whether they are fired, died, retire or quit...the office will go on. John Jordan, Katie Warren, Tiffany Dupree, Tracey Bennett, Tammy Thomas are a few to name who will help the office move forward. Maybe Luci or Murray will go back as First Assistant. Who knows.

Anonymous said...

Hey Eva,
Anon 6:17 here. Jesustittyfucking Christ! You bet your sweet ass I have something to add. A supervising prosecutor's job is to make sure that the people he or she supervises perform as expected. At a minimum the means doing the work and showing up for work. If people cannot or will not do the job they are assigned they should be fired. That's the way the real world works.

Maybe you think everyone gets a trophy. Go teach pre school then.

As for gossip. You are joking right? In any large organization there will be "gossip." That said any supervisor needs to find out what is going on in his or her department. If that is your idea of gossip, then go to your safe space.

Anonymous said...

"Maybe Luci or Murray will go back as First Assistant. Who knows."

Vivian King knows.

Anonymous said...

Anon 9:27 what about Durfee? Maybe he knows.

Anonymous said...

Maybe Durfee knows. Maybe not. Office will gone on.

Eva said...

Anon 6:17/8:46:

Did…did you read your post before clicking ‘submit?’ Because there’s a whole lot going on there.

You say people who don’t do the job as expected deserve to get fired. That’s what happened to most (though by no means all) of the people on that list: they didn’t perform as the incoming DA expects, so they’ve been fired (non-renewed, whatever). And you’re over here bitching because your friends aren’t getting their participation trophies. Your friends just hit the real world. Your friends have to leave their safe space.

You’re also assuming facts not in evidence. You assume everyone driven from that office was fired, and that everyone who left didn’t do the job as expected. The truth is much more complex and complicated than that. If you don’t think so, then you’re not paying attention, and that’s probably why these firings surprised and hurt you so much. Do *you* need a safe space?

You’re absolutely defending gossip as a leadership tactic – and not merely hearing gossip (and then investigating to determine the truth of the matter alleged). You’re defending spreading and perpetuating gossip as a leadership skill. Gossip is hearsay, and there’s a reason corroborating evidence is important. Too many people rely on gossip as gospel, when it’s really rather easy to establish facts in that office by going to the source.

Leaders don’t need to be gossipy middle schoolers. If that’s the only tool in one’s leadership kit, then maybe that person should never have been a supervisor. There are a lot of people who can prosecute (and well), but courtroom skills don’t necessarily translate into good leadership or business skills. There’s not much opportunity in that office to learn or demonstrate the necessary skills for supervisory positions. In fact, there’s almost none. The truth is that many prosecutors lack the life and work experience to learn those skills before becoming prosecutors. And those deficiencies become evident in a big way, and take a toll on the office. None of this information is new, or newly discovered; the same standards have held true throughout several decades and industries. “Everyone does it” isn’t a sufficient reason to excuse substandard behavior.

Anonymous said...

Drop mic for Eva and that dirty laundry.

Anonymous said...

Meanwhile, over at HPD --- Chiefs Montalvo, Buenik, Dirden, Curran, Perales, and Provost signed irrevocable letters of retirement, adding to Mckinney, Lentschke, Eisenman and Chen. Captains Smith, Brown, Holloway, Robertson and Lee are the captains that signed irrevocable retirements today at HPD. That along with 159 other classified ranks. Total carnage at HPD today... Should be a fun ride next few years with that and HCDAO shortage, Houston and Harris County is in for a ride over the near future.

Anonymous said...

What about the DAO investigators? Administrative support staff?

Attorney said...

Investigators and staff are expected to be told something by the end of next week. I heard a completely unsubstantiated rumor that it's going to be bad. Take that for what it's worth.

Why does Kimbra feel the need to keep everything such a secret from us? It's almost like she doesn't think we're on the same team.

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:35, most of those chiefs were only going to get in the way of progress, the combination of knowing none of them would ever be seriously considered for the big spot & their upcoming pension changes doing Art's dirty work for him. The remaining few aren't anything to write home about either, with one exception, but ask around HCSO to hear about similar changes of similar scope, as Ed Gonzalez prepares to take over.

The public should be happy with these changes and all the new judges so the county can reform bail practices, decriminalize low level drug use, and continue to marginalize the death penalty. The savings from offering PR bonds to first time drug offenders alone should free up 1000 beds in the jail for higher level crimes, the saving in manpower by changing priorities in drug offenses can allow the police in both county and city to focus on crimes people care about, and the over use of the death penalty in Harris County is well documented.

Anonymous said...

I hate to break it to you, but judges can't decriminalize anything.

Anonymous said...

Finally some real issues to talk about, although maybe 1:44 AM should put the phone down.

It is interesting, though, that you focus so heavily on judges in a post about the DA, but as far as your specific claims that...


"The public should be happy with these changes and all the new judges so the county can reform bail practices"

Any generalization that all judges of a particular party will not do one thing, or will, as a class, do something else, is just silly. One of the most petty judges I've dealt with about bitchy little things was a Democrat--Guerrero. I felt like Guerrero took pleasure in revoking bonds.

I think the same experience will be had by even some of the incoming judges. Some will embrace PR bonds. Some will not. Some may hide behind the magistrates, who are known to not give PR bonds. And if they are not given by the magistrates, there will be very little savings in terms of jail beds because hundreds of beds are taken up by the time someone spends in intake and the day or so after until they do make bail.

"decriminalize low level drug use"

This is up to the DA (and legislature), not the judges. But it does sound like Ogg is headed that way for pot cases, not narcotics (other than trace cases).

"and continue to marginalize the death penalty."

This is well underway even under Anderson. The single greatest tool to reducing the death penalty has been LWOP, not a change in stance toward the death penalty. If a jury had to either give a guy life with the chance that he gets out, or death, they'd choose death. Now that they have a third option, prosecutors are more likely to use it because they know the defendant can be taken off the streets for good without the crazy-expensive trial and appeals. Think of it like abortion--the best way to prevent abortion is to have good access to birth control. The best way to end the death penalty (effectively) is to show that there are other ways to maintain the same assurance that the defendant will never get out and kill again.


"The savings from offering PR bonds to first time drug offenders alone should free up 1000 beds in the jail for higher level crimes"

Again, this has little to do with the sitting judges. Maybe they hire better magistrates; maybe they hide behind them to keep from looking soft on crime. We'll see. And again, if the PR bond isn't offered by the magistrate, there is really no savings to be had.

"the saving in manpower by changing priorities in drug offenses can allow the police in both county and city to focus on crimes people care about"

While you are right, this will not be because of the judges. It will be because of changes at HCSO and HPD. So far Gonzales has said that he will "lobby for" and "work with other agencies" to do these things, but the truth is that he can do it right now. He simply needs to announce that he will do it, and then get the paperwork and scheduling sorted out. Judges have nothing to do with it. Acevedo did it in Austin, so maybe HPD starts it too.



So, if these were your reason for voting straight ticket, you did it wrong and threw out some good judges simply because of a party affiliation. While that's not smart, all the butthurt from the cops is because their history of voting straight ticket the other way is now constantly at risk. So all of their petty bitching about how unsafe Harris County will be is just plain old bullshit. They're afraid they'll be held accountable, because so far they have not been.

Personally, although I hate to see good people lose their jobs, I like a little instability in the system. Only then will the people in charge not run rough-shod over the rest of us.

Jason Truitt said...

For the record, I'm 11:25.

Anonymous said...

Anon 11:25, I took the comments from 1:44 a little differently, not that he was focusing on judges but including them as part of the potential for changing current practices. Bail reform will not happen if only one slice of the picture addresses it and as others have pointed out of late, with some many key players changing at once, there is a golden opportunity despite some of the excesses displayed by the DA-elect. While party affiliation doesn't translate into new judges marching in lock step, it appears reasonable that the party itself can apply some persuasion and those who know several of them will tell you that they lean that way anyway. And while you are correct about the death penalty, so was the OP who merely stated the death penalty was continuing to be marginalized, not that it was something new.

Anonymous said...

This witch-hunt and vendetta Kim Ogg (and the media) has engaged in in order to ruin Anderson’s career and reputation started the very first day she tired to run for election against Anderson. It is just absolutely sad, tragic and the farthest thing from professional. Now it is spewing over to the prosecutors who dare disagree with her. This is ridiculous! Enough is enough already.

Firing the 37 prosecutors 9 days before Christmas through an email? I know there are always regime changes when a new administration takes over but it would seem to me she knew exactly who would be let go long before now. Why wait and in the manor it was done in? It doesn’t show respect to the people who have devoted their careers to the field of criminal justice. Firing by email is cowardly, doing it right before Christmas makes one look coldhearted and ultimately makes it look like political revenge. There were better ways to handle this, IMHO. Furthermore, with the press conference held the other day, she is exploiting people for her own personal and political gain. Enough is enough. Anyone surprised? Innocent until proven guilty, anyone?? No, here she is the one making assumptions without the facts and says she will not discuss the issues with the prosecutors in question.

It all boils down to this:

Kim Ogg was so desperate to get elected; she said and did anything (and she will continue to do so) even when she KNOWS it’s not true. Having been in that office before, Ogg knows the things coming out of her mouth are untrue. She has run on both parties on the ticket once before-R and D and failed both times if that tells you anything, people did not like her on either side of the ballot before. She only won because she rode on the party ticket; just like all the other D’s. She had to run with corrupt, anti-American Soros behind her. That should have told every voter what they really need to know about her and who is going to be behind running the DA's office. When she was running she basically said that she will pick and choice the laws in which they follow and think should be enforced. That is not how it works. You do not get to choose what the office decides to try based on what you want. The Harris County District Attorney is there to pursue justice and enforce the law, not pick and choice what laws she enforces and upholds whether they agree with it or not. This is what Devon always did, hence the PP case. Maybe she forgot that in her 20 yrs away from being a prosecutor defending criminals?

Yes, we all know the criminal justice system has flaws and with the 116,000 cases filed a year that sometimes things happen but let me just say I will be especially praying for Harris County all around the board for the next 4 years.

Anonymous said...

Hey check out the big brain on Eva! She is clearly the model of leadership!

Anonymous said...

The bunker is stirring. Where's the intel?

Anonymous said...

Jimmy to head GJ
Denholm to head intake (also heard could be lead investigator)
Carvana over fcld
David Mitchum as trial bureau chief
Bradley over juvenile
Vivian as chief of staff
Shawna Reagin over writs
Joanne Musick over sex crimes
Sean Teare over vehicle crimes
Colleen Barnett returning (role unknown)

Anonymous said...

Bradley should be Beadle

Anonymous said...

Who is Bradley over juvenile?

Anonymous said...

Beadle is over misdemeanor, not juvenile.

Anonymous said...

Didn't Sean Teare leave as a felony 3? If that's the case, Ogg is going to put a person in a chief position who hasn't at least been a felony 2 in the office and handled dead body cases? That seems like a fantastic idea.

Anonymous said...

Where are the Hispanics, Kimbra?

Anonymous said...

Is this a joke?

Attorneys,
To assist in the ongoing transition, I am asking that all Felony #2 and Chief Felony prosecutors with trials pending in January 2017 prepare a brief, one-page memo for each January trial case providing the following information:
1) Style of the case;
2) Number of trial settings for the case;
3) Number of continuances, by party;
4) Confirmation that subpoenas have been issued;
5) Known evidentiary/witness issues, problems (very brief description);
6) Estimated length of trial; and
7) Whether the state is ready.
Memos should be attached to the physical file as well as electronically submitted to Naomi Lines in the Trial Bureau by 5:00 PM on December 30, 2016. If you are a Chief Felony prosecutor who will not be returning, your memo should be completed prior to your final day of employment. If you are in a court where the chief is not returning but had trial(s) pending, this responsibility falls to the #2 if the chief fails or is unable for any reason to prepare the requested memo. If this is the case, please note that fact on the memo. If the #2 is unable to answer any of the requested information queries, please note that fact on the memo as well.
Additionally, any prosecutor “holding” any felony trial case who is not currently assigned to the trial court where the case is pending is asked to return the physical file to the chief’s office of the court where the case is assigned. This should also be done by 5:00 pm on Friday, December 30th. The previously requested trial memo is to be included with the file. If the prosecutor who has “held on” to the case is returning to the office in January and desires to try the case, include that notation in the memo.
Thank you all for your professionalism and assistance in these matters.
Best regards,

Anonymous said...

While I would like to ask why any person who is not returning should do this; I know they will. Why? Because even though they are leaving, they care about the others in the office and won't dump the work load on them.

But I have to ask - why is Devon succumbing to this request?

Anonymous said...

Teare left as a 3 to go to PI Work. Ali literally wrote the book, Sean just colored in it.

Anonymous said...

Sean Teare is an excellent trial attorney and will rise to the occasion. No disrespect to Alison, but Kim is bringing in her people regardless. I'm glad Sean is among them.

Murray Newman said...

I agree. Teare is a good lawyer and a good friend. I've known him since the day he passed the Bar.

The man does like his coloring books, though.

Anonymous said...

Alex Forrest as Environmental Crimes chief? Ogg is going to make someone a chief who couldn't even get hired as a misdemeanor 3 at the office? This should be fun to watch.

Anonymous said...

That apparently is what $3500 in campaign contributions will get you....

Anonymous said...

Murray, looking forward to your thoughts on Temple case now that Clappart and Denholm are going to be at the office in 2017.

Anonymous said...

Fat chance Temple is getting retried with Leitner and Denholm coming in

Anonymous said...

News from the Bunker

Confused

No division chiefs

Who will try the division chief cases

No post conviction writ division

Who will defend convictions

Entropy do not ask me how

Compartmentalize integrity conflicts with the obligation to provide access

End of line

Anonymous said...

Happy Birthday Brenda Lucas, twin sister of Belinda Lucas Temple and may Belinda and Erin rest in peace.

Anonymous said...

They are watching and reading. The end.

Anonymous said...

Not a bad return on his investment.

Anonymous said...

Like her predecessors, Kim certainly has the right to bring in her own folks however, I am extremely disappointed that she didn't pick any Latinos No. Bueno Kim.

Anonymous said...

No kidding. Kim fired the two highest ranking Latinos in the Office and brought in zero. The highest ranking remaining Latinos are Felony 2's. The County is almost half Latino and one of her big promises was diversity in her leadership. And don't tell me there aren't talented Latino attorneys out there that would have wanted to serve. They weren't asked.

Anonymous said...

The two on that list did not hold themselves out to be Latino so maybe thats why.

Anonymous said...

Jamie Reyna is Latina and a district court chief.

Anonymous said...

Anon 10:46- Jame Reyna is an amazing prosecutor and person... hoping she continues to climb the ranks. However, I was referring to the fact that Kim didn't bring in any Latino amongst her new arrivals. Por que? There are plenty of talented Latinos in the defense bar worthy of being on her executive team. Again, I voted for Kim but this glaring omission doesn't sit well with me.

Anonymous said...

"The two on that list did not hold themselves out to be Latino"

You gotta advertise you're Latino or it doesn't count?

Anonymous said...

Anon 4:24 you said :"The highest ranking remaining Latinos are Felony 2's." That was incorrect.