Friday, August 21, 2009

Malicious Twits

Looks like the Fake Pat Lykos blogger has gotten the attention of Houston Chronicle legal blogger Mary Flood with this article on the Chron's website today.

Looks like Ms. Flood is as amused with Jared Woodfill's McCarthy-esque accusations of the "wild eyed Liberal elite" being behind the fake Twitter account as I was.

I did enjoy learning what Patsy's response was to the fake Twitter account:

"The fraudulent twitters appear to be the work of a malicious twit."

Should I respond with the "takes one to know one", or is it too obvious?

Nah. Too obvious.

As someone close to me would say "That's beneath you."

I'll let Snooks slide on that one.

20 comments:

Ron in Houston said...

Well coming from anyone other than you and a few others I might say it was unfair.

I think you have a very valid right to call Snookems a malicious twit.

jigmeister said...

I think that description is appropriate: I looked up twit for the hell of it: an insignificant or bothersome person. Coupled with her malicious conduct; seems fair.

Sure you weren't referring to luci. She wouldn't say beneath you.

Anonymous said...

That was such a cute response from the twitch,no I meant witch, I mean bitch, or twit. Do you think that she and Jared "snuggled" after his web letter?

Heck, pat may look like some of the guys Jared likes to "hagout" with!

Rage Judicata said...

I thought it was an interesting play on words.

Although, she commented on the least harmful internet exposure out there. Others do far more harm to her than that twitter account ever did.

Jason said...

In about another week that will be against the law.

Anonymous said...

If it becomes "against the law," some "insignificant or bothersome person . . . [c]coupled with malicious conduct" could prosecute it.

Anonymous said...

"Others do far more harm to her than that twitter account ever did."

People usually bring on the harm that comes to them, don't they?

Anonymous said...

Hey Murray,

Why don't you pick a new subject to discuss?

The Chronicle is running a story about the 11,000 inmates inside the Harris County jail languishing about and waiting to go to trial, many for misdemeanor drug charges....there are lots of important issues at the Harris County CJC that you could converse about.

Lykos is here for the duration of her term....time to find something more interesting to talk about.

Anonymous said...

Lykos on jail overcrowding:"“We're looking at all of that, on scheduling of court cases and so forth, about giving priority to jail cases,” said District Attorney Pat Lykos. “Right now you cannot tell by looking at the case how long someone has been in jail ... I can't give you answers right now because we don't have the data to base a rational answer, but we're going to get it and we're going to get it soon.”"

What a BS politician answer. Jail overcrowding can easily be remedied--criminals, stop comitting crimes.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/6583478.html

A Harris County Lawyer said...

Anon 4:00 a.m.,
Thanks for getting up so early in the morning to advise me on the content of my blog. I'll give it all the consideration it's due.

My thoughts on jail overcrowding?

More people are getting arrested than the jails have room for. More thorough consideration of reduction of bond amounts and more frequent use of PR bonds could help alleviate this.

Anything else?

Anon 8:20,
I guess that Lykos and her group aren't familiar with the LMDT screen on JIMS which will tell you the exact amount of time a defendant has been in jail on any given case.

Anonymous said...

Where is the woman who got the political payoff to be JAIL CZAR?

A Harris County Lawyer said...

The "woman" you are referring to is Judge Caprice Cosper.

She just got appointed to the job last month and she got appointed to help solve these problems. She's the best damn judge I ever worked for, but she can't solve the problem overnight.

Give her a bit. She'll figure it out. She always does.

Rage Judicata said...

We'll see how Judge Cosper does. There are tons of existing tools at her disposal right now, all of which are free or at far less cost than what we currently do, which is incarcerating enough over 11,000 people for non-violent and low-risk crimes.

That's how many people live in Athens, Texas. And we have them in jail.

I'm hoping from the best from her. You might recall, however, that I said the same thing about Lykos upon her election.

I know many of you will balk when I draw comparisons between the two, but Cosper is decidedly pro-prosecution by all accounts, meaning that she may not be the best person to study our over incarceration problem. At the very least, she'll need her opinions balanced out by someone with the belief that not every person should be locked up until trial, no matter what the circumstances.

A Harris County Lawyer said...

Rage,
I disagree with you in your assessment of Judge Cosper being pro-prosecution and I was her Chief for a year and a half. Although she wasn't afraid to pop the hell out of a violent offender, she was the first to try to help the non-violent with substance abuse problems.
What she always did without fail was follow the law.
She told me once: "Mr. Newman, there are people we are afraid of and people we are mad at. You would be well served to learn the difference."
And I did. It made me a better prosecutor too.
Have a little faith in her.

Rage Judicata said...

I'll certainly defer to your personal experience until I have reason not to.

However, your stance that you were "her" chief certainly underscores the all-too-close relationship between the DA's office and the judiciary.

Like I said, I'm hoping for the best, but still believe she'll need to listen to known reformers.

Anonymous said...

"However, your stance that you were "her" chief certainly underscores the all-too-close relationship between the DA's office and the judiciary."

Many, many courts have the same attorneys appointed weekly for defendants. Some have only 3 or 4 appointed every single day. These defense attorneys are beholden to the judge for their livelihood. Do you think these defense attorneys are "her" (or his) attorneys? Damn right they are.

Anonymous said...

"More thorough consideration of reduction of bond amounts and more frequent use of PR bonds could help alleviate this."

But then once they are out on bond, they have to plead to the crime (if they did it of course), and if you can't make a small bond, you likely can't pay a fine. Therefore, it's to jail with you for a few days, thus getting us back where we started.

Rage Judicata said...

Do you think these defense attorneys are "her" (or his) attorneys? Damn right they are.

I agree with that too, and have been more than vocal on instances where I think attorneys will do things to the detriment of their clients in order to protect their pockets or relationships with judges or prosecutors.

http://ragejudicata.blogspot.com/2009/03/all-that-is-necessary-for-evil-to.html

Just because it's wrong on one side doesn't mean it's OK for the other to do it.

Any questions?

Rage Judicata said...

Therefore, it's to jail with you for a few days, thus getting us back where we started.

Not really. We have people in jail for a few weeks or months, often serving more time pre-trial than their offense would carry if convicted.

A few days after a plea is much cheaper than weeks or months before.

Anonymous said...

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/6584455.html